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Jan Behrs

Jan Behrs

Visiting DAAD Professor

Phone number: 847-467-7067
Office location: Kresge Hall, Room 3-337
jan.behrs@northwestern.edu
Jan Behrs is DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) Visiting Associate Professor in the Department of German. He received his Ph.D. in German Literature in 2012 from Humboldt University in Berlin. His dissertation focused on the interdependence between literature and literary scholarship: What does it mean for literature if it is constantly monitored by scholars, as it has been the case in Germany at least since the late 19th century? The work appeared under the title “Der Dichter und sein Denker” (Stuttgart: Hirzel 2013). He also wrote a book on transfer of knowledge in scientific communities (together with Benjamin Gittel and Ralf Klausnitzer: Wissenstransfer. Konditionen, Praktiken, Verlaufsformen der Weitergabe von Erkenntnis. Bern: Lang 2013). The topics of recent articles include Axel Honneth’s theory of recognition and its application in literary studies (Anerkannt oder kleingehackt? Einige Spezifika literarischer Anerkennung am Beispiel von Hubert Fichtes Roman Die Palette, in A. Albrecht/T. Venzl/M. Schramm: Literatur und Anerkennung. Wechselwirkungen und Perspektiven, Berlin 2017) and late Goethe (Wann beginnt Goethes Spätwerk? Dichtung und Wahrheit als Schwellentext, in K. Sina/D. Wellbery: Goethes Spätwerk / On Late Goethe, forthcoming). Before coming to Northwestern, he taught at the universities of Stuttgart and Kiel and worked as a copy editor in a publishing house. His teaching and research interests include the sociology of literature, theories of newness and innovation in literary scholarship, German baroque literature, the literary canon and its fringes, and contemporary German literature and film.  

Peter Fenves

Peter Fenves

Professor

Phone number: 847-491-8245
Office location: Kresge Hall, Room 3-329
p-fenves@northwestern.edu
Peter Fenves, Joan and Sarepta Harrison Professor of Literature, is Professor of German, Comparative Literary Studies, Jewish Studies, and Asian Languages and Cultures.  He is the author of A Peculiar Fate: Metaphysics and World-History in Kant (Cornell University Press, 1991), “Chatter”: Language and History in Kierkegaard (Stanford University Press, 1993), Arresting Language: From Leibniz to Benjamin (Stanford University Press, 2001), and Late Kant: Towards Another Law of the Earth (Routledge, 2003), which was translated into German in 2010, with a Spanish translation underway; The Messianic Reduction: Walter Benjamin and the Shape of Time (Stanford University Press, 2010); and Walter Benjamin entre los filósofos (Palinodia, 2017). Professor Fenves is also the editor of Raising the Tone of Philosophy: Late Essays by Kant, Transformative Critique by Derrida (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993), the co-editor of “The Spirit of Poesy”: Essays on Jewish and German Literature and Philosophy in Honor of Géza von Molnár (Northwestern University Press, 2000), and the co-editor of Points of Departure:  Samuel Weber Between Spectrality and Reading (Northwestern University Press, 2016).  He is also the translator of Werner Hamacher’s Premises: Literature and Philosophy from Kant to Celan (Harvard University Press, 1996). In addition, he provided an extensive introduction to a new English edition of Max Brod’s early novel, Tycho Brahe’s Path to God (Northwestern University Press, 2006). The author of numerous essays and articles on a variety of topics, Professor Fenves’s essays on German literature (besides those collected in Arresting Language) include “Continuing the Fiction: From Leibniz’ ‘petite fable’ to Kafka’s In der Strafkolonie,” MLN 116 (2001); “Die Scham der Schönheit: einige Bemerkungen zu Stifter,” in “Geteilte Aufmerksamkeit”: Zur Frage des Lesens; “Johann Christian Friedrich Hölderlin,” in The Encyclopedia of Aesthetics; “Measure for Measure: Hölderlin and the Place of Philosophy,” in The Solid Letter: New Readings of Friedrich Hölderlin; “‘Workforce Without Possessions: Kafka, ‘Social Justice,” and the Word Religion,” in Freedom and Confinement in Modernity: Kafka’s Cages; “‘When Christianity is Finally Over’: Images of a Messianic Mobility in Heine and Benjamin,” in Messianic Thought Outside Theology; and “The Category of Philology,” in For Love of Words: Hamacher and Philology. Among his inquiries into German philosophy (beyond his books on Kant) are “Marx’s Doctoral Thesis on Two Greek Atomists and the Post-Kantian Interpretations,” The Journal of the History of Ideas 46 (1986); “Image and Chatter: Adorno’s Construction of Kierkegaard,” Diacritics 22 (1992); “The Revelation of Irony: The Young Kierkegaard Listens to the Old Schelling,” in International Kierkegaard Commentary: “The Concept of Irony”; “Language on a Holy Day: Mendelssohn and the Temporality of Language in Jerusalem,” in Perspectives on Early Modern and Modern Intellectual History; “What is Aufklärung (in Pennsylvania)?” in American Babel: Literatures of the United States from Abnaki to Zuni; “Imagining an Inundation of Australians; or Leibniz on the Principles of Grace and Race,” in Race and Modern Philosophy; and “Martin Heidegger,” in Blackwell Encyclopedia of Literary and Cultural Theory; “Absent an Even Finer Feeling: A Commentary on the Opening of Observations on the Feeling of the Beautiful and the Sublime.” in The Cambridge Companion to Kant’s “Observations on the Feeling of the Beautiful and Sublime”; “Kierkegaard and the Definition of the Demonic,” in Das Dämonische nach Goethe: Schicksale einer Kategorie der Zweideutigkeit nach Goethe; “Renewed Question: Whether a Philosophy of History is Possible,” MLN 129 (2014); “‘Thankless Trouble’—Ethical Contemplation of Nature,” The Yearbook of Comparative Literature 58 (2012); “From Nietzsche’s Philosophy of History to Kant’s—and Back,” History and Theory 54 (2015). His essays and articles on contemporary critical thought include “From Empiricism to the Experience of Freedom,” Paragraph 16 (1993); “Marx, Mourning, Messianicity,” in Violence, Identity, and Self-Determination; “Derrida and History: Some Questions Derrida Pursues in his Early Writings,” in Jacques Derrida and the Humanities: A Critical Reader; “Postmodern Theories of Alterity and Identity” and “Jean-Luc Nancy,” in The Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy; “Technica Speciosa: Some Notes on the Ambivalence of Technics in Kant and Weber,” in Experimenting: Essays with Samuel Weber; “The Courage of the Critic: Avital Ronell and the Idea of Emergence,” in Reading Ronell; and “Toward another Teichology,” in Babel: für Werner Hamacher. Professor Fenves has written extensively on Walter Benjamin beyond his recent book, including “Testing Right—Lying in View of Justice,” Cardoza Law Review 13 (December, 1991); “The Genesis of Judgment: Spatiality, Analogy, and Metaphor in Benjamin’s ‘On Language as Such and on Human Language,’” in Walter Benjamin: Theoretical Questions; “Die Unterlassung der Übersetzung,” in Übersetzen: Walter Benjamin; “Of Philosophical Style—From Leibniz to Benjamin,” boundary 2 30 (spring, 2003); “Is There an Answer to the Aestheticizing of the Political?” in Actualities of Aura and Walter Benjamin and Art; “Über das Programm der kommenden Philosophie,” in Benjamin-Handbuch; “Um Worte Verlegen: Zur Benjamins gegenhistorischen Lektüre Hölderlins,” in Walter Benjamin und die romantische Moderne; and “A Concept in Combat with Itself: Benjamin, Hölderlin, and ‘Temporal Plasticity,’” PMLA 124 (January 2009); “Benjamin’s Early Reception in the United States:  A Report,” in Benjamin-Studien 3; “Entanglement—Of Benjamin with Heidegger,” in Sparks Will Fly:  Heidegger and Benjamin; “Kant in Benjamins Wahlverwandtschaften-Essay,” in Benjamins Wahlverwandtschaften.  Zur Kritik einer programmatischen Interpretation; “Completion Instead of Revelation: Toward the ‘Theological-Political Fragment,’’ in Benjamin and Theology;  “The Problem of Popularization in Benjamin, Schrödinger, and Heidegger circa 1935 in The Germanic Review 91 (2016); “Toward Messianic Nature—from Cohen to Benjamin,” Paradigmi: Rivista di critica filosofica 35 (2017); and “Benjamin, Studying, China,” Positions (2018). Professor Fenves received his BA from Wesleyan University, studied at the Freie Universität Berlin, and received PhD from the Johns Hopkins University (1989). He has taught at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, the Johns Hopkins University, Princeton University, and Harvard University in addition to Northwestern.

Christine Helmer

Christine Helmer

Professor

Phone number: 847-491-2616
Office location: Kresge Hall, 3-341
c-helmer@northwestern.edu
For details on the conference, “Luther’s Anti-Jewish Interpretation of the Bible,” at Boston College (March 24-26, 2018) please see website Christine Helmer (Ph.D. Yale) is Professor of German at Northwestern University, with a courtesy appointment in the Department of Religious Studies. She is the current holder of the Arthur E. Andersen Teaching and Research Professorship. In 2017 she was awarded an honorary doctorate in theology from the University of Helsinki for her work on German reformer Martin Luther, as well as for her commitment to theology as an important contributor to the intellectual life of the university. During the academic year 2017-2018, she is Visiting Corcoran Chair in the Center for Christian-Jewish Relations at Boston College, researching Luther’s anti-Judaism in his biblical interpretation. Professor Helmer’s area of research and teaching specialization is Christian theology from historical, systematic, and constructive perspectives. Her work is focused on German intellectual history with primary interest in the theology of Martin Luther, the philosophy and theology of Friedrich Schleiermacher, and the flourishing of scholarship on Luther and on religion in early twentieth-century Germany, known as the Luther Renaissance. She is also interested in ways in which theologians can make knowledge claims about God; in theology’s conversation with the modern study of religion; and in how the theological perspective contributes to the humanities. Another area of her research and publication activity is biblical reception, and as main editor for the Christianity section of the Encyclopedia of Bible and its Reception (de Gruyter), she promotes conversation about this emerging discipline. Professor Helmer has a longstanding interest in Christian doctrine. Her recent book, Theology and the End of Doctrine (Westminster John Knox Press 2014) offers a historical analysis of theology’s preoccupation with doctrine over the last century, of the disrepute into which doctrine subsequently fell, and a constructive proposal for renewing doctrinal production as a creative enterprise. Her first monograph, The Trinity and Martin Luther, reprinted as a second edition in 2017 (Lexham Press), concerns the doctrine of the Trinity and Luther’s use of philosophy to articulate Christian theology. Dr. Helmer is the author of many articles as well as contributing editor (and co-editor) of numerous volumes in biblical theology, philosophy of religion, Schleiermacher studies, and Luther studies. Her collaborative work over the past years has focused on the reception of Luther’s thought in the modern world, represented in the recently published co-edited volume, Lutherrenaissance: Past and Present (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht 2015) and in a forthcoming co-edited volume (with Bruce McCormack and Heinrich Assel) on Luther in Weimar. She has recently founded a group called “Lutheran Scholars of Religion” that aims to articulate theologies addressing urgent cultural, religious, climatological, and political challenges. Professor Helmer’s research has been supported by the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) and the Humboldt Foundation. During 2012-2013 she was the Marie Curie EURIAS (European Institutes of Advanced Study) Fellow at the Helsinki Collegium of Advanced Studies in Helsinki, Finland. During 2014-2105, she was a Research Fellow in the Philosophy and Theology of Humility Project, based at Saint Louis University. Professor Helmer is Associate Chair of Willard Hall. She teaches undergraduate courses on key religious thinkers in western thought, religion and sports, and the popular “Why College?” class. Her course “Luther and the West” is available as a free massive open online course (MOOC) at www.coursera.org/learn/luther-and-the-west. Students interested in applying for graduate work with Dr. Helmer should do so through the Department of German. Photo credit: Veikko Somerpuro Selected Works Books The Trinity and Martin Luther. Lexham Press, 2017 Theology and the End of Doctrine. Louisville, Ky.: Westminster John Knox Press, 2014 The Trinity and Martin Luther: A Study on the Relationship between Genre, Language and the Trinity in Luther’s Works (1523-1546). Veröffentlichungen des Instituts für Europäische Geschichte/Abteilung Abendländische Religionsgeschichte 174. Mainz: Philipp von Zabern, 1999. Edited Volumes Lutherrenaissance: Past and Present. Edited by Christine Helmer and Bo Kristian Holm. Forschungen zur Kirchen- and Dogmengeschichte 106. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2015. LUTERO: Um teologo para tempos modernos. Edited by Christine Helmer. Translated by Geraldo Korndörfe. São Leopoldo: Sinodal, 2013. The Global Luther: A Theologian for Modern Times. Edited by Christine Helmer. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2009. Transformations in Luther's Theology: Historical and Contemporary Reflections. Edited by Christine Helmer and Bo Kristian Holm. Arbeiten zur Kirchen- und Theologiegeschichte 32. Leipzig: EVA-Leipzig, 2011. The Multivalence of Biblical Texts and Theological Meanings. Edited by Christine Helmer with Charlene T. Higbe. Symposium Series 37. Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2006. Biblical Interpretation: History, Context, and Reality. Edited by Christine Helmer with Taylor G. Petrey. Symposium Series 26. Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2005. Schleiermacher and Whitehead: Open Systems in Dialogue. Edited by Christine Helmer, in Cooperation with Marjorie Suchocki, John Quiring, and Katie Goetz. Theologische Bibliothek Töpelmann 125. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2004. One Scripture or Many? Canon from Biblical, Theological, and Philosophical Perspectives. Edited by Christine Helmer and Christof Landmesser. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. Truth: Interdisciplinary Dialogues in a Pluralist Age. Edited by Christine Helmer and Kristin De Troyer, with Katie Goetz. Studies in Philosophical Theology 22. Leuven: Peeters, 2003. Schleiermachers Dialektik: Die Liebe zum Wissen in Philosophie und Theologie. Edited by Christine Helmer, Christiane Kranich, and Birgit Rehme-Iffert. Religion in Philosophy and Theology 6. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2003. Biblischer Text und theologische Theoriebildung. Edited by Christine Helmer, Stephen Chapman, and Christof Landmesser. Biblisch-theologische Studien 44. Neukirchen-Vluyn: Neukirchener Verlag, 2001. Interviews, Web Audio/Video Podcast: “Luther and the West,” with Tripp Fuller, posted by Homebrewed Christianity, Feb. 2, 2017. Conference video: “What is Distinctive about the Fifth Centenary of the Protestant Reformation?,” at Georgetown University, Sept. 15, 2017. Podcast: “Luther in America,” at the Boisi Center for Religion and American Public Life, Boston College, Oct. 5, 2017. Conference video: “Luther, the Age of the Individual: 500 Years Ago Today,” at Columbia University’s Center on Capitalism and Society, Oct. 31, 2017. Blogpost: “Martin Luther and the History of Human Rights,” Pozen Family Center for Human Rights at The University of Chicago, Oct. 30, 2017. Blogpost: “The Protestant Reformation and Human Rights,” The Immanent Frame, Nov. 8, 2017. Podcast: "Conversation about Theology and the End of Doctrine," with Tripp Fuller, posted by Homebrewed Christianity, Oct. 9, 2014.

Martina Kerlova

Martina Kerlova

Associate Professor of Instruction

Phone number: 847-491-5788
Office location: Kresge Hall, Room 3-325
m-kerlova@northwestern.edu
Martina Kerlova, coordinator of second-year German and Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUS) for the Slavic department, has been a member of the German and Slavic Departments since 2002. Before coming to Northwestern she earned Master’s Degrees in German Studies from Charles University in Prague and in German language and Literature from Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic. Her theses were on “Schriftsteller des Grazer ‘Forum Stadtpark’ und Wolfgang Bauer im realen Umfeld der Gesellschaft” and on “The Politics of the Sudeten German Party in Interwar Czechoslovakia.” She has earned fellowships from DAAD, ÖAD, the Robert Bosch Stiftung and the Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung, and has studied in Vienna, Konstanz, Düsseldorf, Graz, and Leipzig. Kerlova’s course offerings have included first, second and third-year German and Czech, as well as “Prague: City of Cultures, City of Conflict,” “Czech New Wave Film: Cinema with a Human Face,” and “Germans and Slavs.” In 2015 the Association for Student Government named her to the ASG Faculty Honor Roll. Kerlova received a grant from the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities to participate in the 2016-2017 Digital Humanities Summer Faculty Workshop and two Hewlett grants to support the development of video-based teaching materials. She translated into Czech Remaining Relevant after Communism: The Role of the Writer in Eastern Europe, by Andrew Wachtel. In her previous lives Martina taught German in Prague and Vienna and administered the European Union’s “Leonardo” retraining program for the Czech Republic. In her free time she likes to read literature, attend theater performances, backpack in National Parks and cross-country ski.

Jörg Kreienbrock

Jörg Kreienbrock

Associate Professor

Phone number: 847-491-8294
Office location: Kresge Hall, Room 3-323
j-kreienbrock@northwestern.edu
Jörg Kreienbrock received his Ph.D. in 2005 from the Department of German at New York University with a dissertation thesis examining representations of the small and minute in the prose works of Robert Walser. From 2005 to 2006 he held a position as Visiting Assistant Professor of German Studies at Emory University. His research and teaching interests include German literature from the 18th to the 21st century with an emphasis on literary theory, contemporary literature, the history of science, and popular culture. Professor Kreienbrock is the author of: Kleiner. Feiner. Leichter: Nuancierungen zum Werk Robert Walsers, Berlin, Zurich: Diaphanes 2010; Malicious Objects, Anger Management, and the Question of Modern Literature, New York: Fordham University Press 2012; and as co-editor: Die Amerikanischen Götter: Transatlantische Prozesse in der Deutschsprachigen Popkultur seit 1945, Berlin: de Gruyter 2015.He spent the 2015/16 academic year as an Alexander von Humboldt Foundation-Fellow at the Department of Media Studies at the University of Bochum. He also recently received fellowships from the Institute of Advanced Study at Durham University (UK) and the International Research Center for Cultural Studies in Vienna.Recent publications include: “A New Levante: Franz Rosenzweig’s Geopolitical Imagination in his War Writings of 1917,” in Anthony Barker et al. (eds.), Micronarratives and Peripheral Theatres of the Great War, New York, NY: Springer 2018, pp. 185-200.; “The Border as Regulator of Life: Gustav Freytag’s Uncontainable Realism,” in: The Germanic Review, Vol. 90, No. 3, (2016), pp. 204-218; “Seeland,” in: Lucas M. Gisi (ed.), Robert Walser-Handbuch: Leben – Werk – Wirkung, Stuttgart: Metzler 2015, pp. 163-166.

Franziska Lys

Franziska Lys

Professor

Phone number: 847-491-8298
Office location: Kresge Hall, Room 3-317
flys@northwestern.edu
Professor Lys’ research is concerned with the application and evaluation the effectiveness of media-related and technological innovations to improve the learning of foreign languages. Since 1987 Dr. Lys has been collaborating with Dr. William Anthony on the production of various educational documentaries. They have produced and directed Drehort: Neubrandenburg (On location in Neubrandenburg; 1991) a documentary about the lives of the people in a former East German town, AZUBI (Three Apprentices in Berlin, 1994) a documentary about the apprenticeship system in Germany, Drehort Bern, Gesichter einer Stadt (On location in Bern, faces of a city; 1997) a documentary about people in the city of Berne, Switzerland, and Drehort: Neubrandenburg 2002 (On location in Neubrandenburg; 2004), an update to the original film documenting the lives of the people in Neubrandenburg ten years after the Wende. Professor Lys has been developing and testing, among others, multi-media language software using her own documentary materials. She has developed Drehort: Neubrandenburg Interaktiv, an interactive online learning environment for German, Azubi: Interaktiv, and Intermatik, an interactive online grammar and culture software for intermediate German. She has received major grants, about 16 in the last 12 years alone ($ 110,000 internal funds and $ 25,000 external funds) for her current research which deals with the introduction of new technologies such as iPhones and iPads to improve language learning and teaching. Dr. Lys has published a wide variety of material discussing the benefits of second language acquisition, computer-assisted language instruction, and active learning in volumes such as Task-Based Instruction in Foreign Language Education: Principles and Practices, Body and Language Intercultural Learning Through Drama, Schnittstellen: Lehrwerke zwischen alten und neuen Medien, Computer Enhanced Learning: Vignettes of the Best Practice from America's Most Wired Campuses, Fremdsprachen Lehren und Lernen, Technology for Language Learning: Faculty authored Libra Courseware, and in the following journals: "CALICO", "Die Unterrichtspraxis", "IDV-Magazine", "GFL-Journal", and "Language Learning & Technology". Recent publications include: A Cross-Departmental Approach to Supporting Students with a Disability Affecting Foreign Language Acquisition. (Co-authored with Alison May and Jeanne Ravid). Prague Journal of English Studies. 2014. V3(1), 85-111. The Development of Oral Proficiency in Advanced Learners Using iPads. In Language Learning & Technology. 2013. 17(3), 94-116. Computer-Mediated Grammar Teaching and its Effect on Different Language Tasks. In Hubbard, P., Schulze, M., & Smith, B. (Eds.), Learner-Computer Interaction in Language Education. CALICO. 2013, 166-186. Looking Back—A Lesson Learned: From Videotape to Digital Media. In CALICO, Special Issue on Technology.2010. 2(3), 564-575. Die Bewohner der Stadt Neubrandenburg kurz nach der Wende und zehn Jahre danach. In IDV Magazin (Internationaler Deutschlehrer Verband). 2010. 82(2), 272-287. Von der Exkursion zur medialen Lernumgebung: Der Einfluss des Bauhauses auf die moderne amerikanische Stadt. In gfl-journal. 2010. 2, 64-88. (co-authored with Denise Meuser and Ingrid Zeller). “I asked my parents why a wall was so important”: Teaching on the GDR and Post-Reunification Germany. InDie Unterrichtspraxis/Teaching German. 2008. 41(2), 134-143. (co-authored with Bernhard Streitwieser) (This article won the Best Article Award in 2008 in Die Unterrichtspraxis/Teaching German). Using Web Technology to Promote Writing, Analytical Thinking, and Creative Expression in German. In Task-Based Instruction in Foreign Language Education: Principles and Practices. (Eds. Betty Lou Leaver and Jane G. Willis). Georgetown University Press. 2004. 228 –253. Performing Brecht: From Theory To Practice. In Body and Language Intercultural Learning Through Drama. ABLEX Series: Advances in Foreign and Second Language Pedagogy. (Ed. by Gerd Braeuer). Emory University. 2002. 207-232. Interaktives Video: neue Potentiale für den Fremdsprachenunterricht. Methodisch-Didaktische Überlegungen und praktische Beispiele. In Schnittstellen: Lehrwerke zwischen alten und neuen Medien. Cornelsen Verlag, Berlin. 2001. 154-171. Using Technology to Increase Writing. In Computer Enhanced Learning: Vignettes of the Best Practice from America's Most Wired Campuses. (Ed. David G. Brown). Anker Publishing Company, Inc. Bolton, MA. 2000. 250-253.

Denise Meuser

Denise Meuser

Associate Professor of Instruction

Phone number: 847-491-8292
Office location: Kresge Hall, Room 3-319
dmeuser@northwestern.edu
Denise M. Meuser is an Associate Professor of Instruction in the Department of German. She received her B.A. in German from DePauw University and a M.A. in Germanic Studies from Indiana University. She has taught elementary and intermediate courses for the college since 1991 and is currently the Coordinator for the Beginning German program. She teaches an intermediate conversation course that focuses on improving speaking skills and incorporates new technology and is presently preparing a language course focused on turn of the century German women artists. She has co-produced, with Ingrid Zeller and Franziska Lys, an interactive architecture tour of Chicago for students of German entitled Bauhaus and Beyond and has used students response systems and iPads in her teaching. She is interested in the study of second language acquisition and regularly attends workshops and conferences that focus on such topics as technology in the classroom, content-based instruction, backwards design and the teaching of culture and language across the curriculum. Denise has served as Co-Chair of the Council on Language Instruction in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences and continues to participate today in its mission to enhance language instruction across departments. She is a Fellow for Chapin Hall, the Humanities Residential College and has served as a Freshmen Adviser to students in the combined Weinberg College and Bienen School of Music dual degree program. Presently, Denise is serving as Director of the Berlin: Global City in the Center of Europe Program, a Northwestern University and Humboldt University joint summer program. She is the proud mother of two children, active in her community, and enjoys travel, the arts and gardening.

Marcus Moseley

Marcus Moseley

Associate Professor

Phone number: 847-467-4712
Office location: Kresge Hall, Room 3-339
m-moseley@northwestern.edu
Marcus Moseley received his M.A. in Religious Studies from the University of Edinburgh and his Ph.D. from the University of Oxford in 1990 in Hebrew and Yiddish literature. He was awarded a Koret Foundation Jewish Studies Publication Program prize for his book, Being For Myself Alone: Origins of Jewish Autobiography (Stanford University Press, 2005), which investigates the development of autobiography among the Jews in Eastern Europe from the 19th century to the period just around World War I. His focus in this book is on works written in Hebrew, but he also spends a significant amount of time considering Yiddish and German works as well as the interaction among these languages of Jewish expression in this period. He is now working on his next book, From People of the Book to Literary Nation: On the Emergence of Literature in Jewish Eastern Europe, which describes the rise of the new phenomenon of literature in Jewish Eastern Europe of the 18th and 19th centuries. In exploring the cultural, social and ideological ramifications of the painful transition from "people of the book" to "literary nation" as experienced by the secular, or secularizing, sector of East European Jewry, Moseley sheds light on how Jewish writers and (even more importantly) readers began to construct modern Jewish identity. In 1992 Moseley initiated a project to prepare an English language anthology of the interwar YIVO youth autobiography collections housed in the YIVO Archives, for which he received a major grant from the National Endowment of Humanities. He chaired the editorial committee for this volume,Awakening Lives: Autobiographies of Jewish Youth in Poland before the Holocaust (Yale University Press, 2002), to which he also contributed an introduction. Dr. Moseley has taught a wide variety of courses on Hebrew and Yiddish literature at graduate and undergraduate levels at the Universities of New York, Harvard, Oxford and Johns Hopkins. He has close links with the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research in New York, where he worked as an Assistant Archivist from 1987-91.

John Paluch

John Paluch

Associate Professor of Instruction

Phone number: 847-491-8081
Office location: Kresge Hall, Room 3-315
paluch@northwestern.edu
John Paluch is Associate Professor of Instruction in the Department of German and has taught language and content courses at Northwestern since 1990. His effective teaching methods have earned him nomination to the Student Government Faculty Honor Roll in 2003, 2004 and 2013. He also received the Northwestern Alumni Association Teaching Award in 2002. As the departmental Study Abroad Adviser, he works with students to integrate overseas study into their undergraduate curriculum and also helps students to identify additional opportunities to return to Germany, Austria, or Switzerland following graduation. As a member of the campus Fulbright Committee, he works with students as they prepare Fulbright and DAAD grant applications. He is currently co-chair of the Council on Language Instruction and has a long association with the International Studies Residential College. John has been involved with the Northern Illinois Chapter of the American Association since beginning his graduate studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago in 1986 and has held positions as membership chair, vice-president and president. He has been particularly involved with the AATG Testing and Awards program, which was hosted by Northwestern for many years. With other AATG members he founded the Immersion Weekend for Teachers and was director from 1998-2011. He is also active with the Swiss Benevolent Society (SBS) where he chairs the education committee. John earned his A.B. in Art History from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and his M.A. in German Literature from the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is a life long resident of Chicago and has studied and traveled extensively in Europe.

Anna Parkinson

Anna Parkinson

Associate Professor

Phone number: 847-467-5173
Office location: Kresge Hall, Room 3-321
a-parkinson@northwestern.edu
Anna Parkinson is Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of German, Interim Co-Director of the Critical Theory Cluster, and an affiliate of the Gender and Sexuality Studies Program at Northwestern University. Her research has been supported by grants from institutions including the DAAD, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Deutsches Literaturarchiv (Marbach), the American Psychoanalytic Association, the Association for Women-in German, the "Languages of Emotion" Excellence Cluster at the Freie Universität Berlin, and the Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Her first book, titled An Emotional State: The Politics of Emotion in Postwar West German Culture, was published in 2015 by the University of Michigan Press in the "Social History, Popular Culture, and Politics in Germany" series. Her other publications include: “Under the Sign of Caricature: Figuring Exile in Adolf Hoffmeister’s The Unwilling Tourist (1941-42)” in Exilforschung  (2017), “A Sentimental Re-education: Postwar West Germany’s Intimate Geographies” in Emotion, Space and Society (2017), ““In der Fremde zuhause”: Contingent Cosmopolitanism and Elective Exile in the Writing of Hans Keilson” (forthcoming), “Zwischen Nirgendwo und Immer Wieder: Das Unzeitgemäße in Hans Keilsons Romanen und die nicht ganz verpasste Begegnung mit dem Tod des Widersachers,” (forthcoming) and “Adorno on the Airwaves: Feeling Reason, Educating Emotions,” in German Politics and Society (2014). Currently she is working on a series of essays addressing the Jewish-German author and psychoanalyst Hans Keilson's writings and biography. Her new book project is linked to modalities of evidence in forensics and art, drawing on her involvement as co-convener (with Professor Sarah Nuttall, Director of the Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research /WISER at the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, SA) of the project “Trauma, Politics, and the Uses of Memory,” in the Andrew W. Mellon Project “Critical Theory in the Global South” in the Program in Critical Theory at Northwestern (partner university in the International Consortium of Critical Theory Programs). See: http://www.criticaltheory.northwestern.edu/mellon-project/critical-theory-in-the-global-south/   Teaching and research interests include: twentieth and twenty-first century German-language literature and film, psychoanalytic and critical theory, modern South African literature and film, memory studies, literature of migration, gender and queer theory, literary theory, genocide studies, and media of the Cold War era.

Robert Ryder

Robert Ryder

Assistant Professor of Instruction

Phone number: 847-491-8295
Office location: 1880 Campus Drive, Kresge Hall 3327
rob.ryder@northwestern.edu
From 2014-2017 Rob was the Director of the Basic Language Program in the Germanic Studies Department at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Previously he spent two years as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the International Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture (GCSC) in Germany, was a Visiting Professor at the University of Chicago, and in 2009 completed his PhD in German and Comparative Literary Studies at Northwestern University. He received his MA in Comparative Literature from the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario.   His first monograph, Hearing Otherwise: The Acoustical Unconscious from Walter Benjamin to Alexander Kluge (forthcoming with Northwestern UP), explores the psychological, media-historical and theoretical implications of an “acoustical unconscious” with respect to both literature and acoustic media such as radio and film. Recent articles include, “Of Barks and Bird Song: Listening in on the Forgotten in Ludwig Tieck’s Der blonde Eckbert” (Goethe Jahrbuch, Fall 2017), the “Innervation” entry in Wenzel and Szeman’s Fueling Culture. 101 Words for Energy and Environment (Fordham UP, 2017), and “On the Minute, Out of Time: Reading the Misreading of Time in Walter Benjamin’s ‘Auf die Minute’” (Germanic Review, Summer 2016).   Rob has increasingly used online teaching tools to enhance his German language courses, and in Summer of 2017 he co-published qualitative results of a game app he designed as a supplement to German language instruction (“The ‘UIC German’ game app for the enhancement of foreign language learning - Case study” in the International Journal of Education Technology). While his teaching is currently focused on the Business German sequence, he has also taught German courses focused on literary genres like the German graphic novel and das Hörspiel. He has also taught courses on topics as diverse as the intersection of man and technology (“Mensch und Maschine”), business operations in German-speaking countries (“Germany, Inc.”), Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony (“Clockwork Ode: from Schiller to Kubrick”), and hell (“Comparative Narratives of Descent”).

Samuel Weber

Samuel Weber

Professor

Phone number: 847-491-8296
Office location: Kresge Hall, Room 3-335
s-weber@northwestern.edu
Samuel Weber is Avalon Foundation Professor of Humanities at Northwestern and co-director of its Paris Program in Critical Theory. Professor Weber studied with Paul de Man and Theodor W. Adorno, whose book, Prisms, he co-translated into English. The translation of, and introduction to Theodor Adorno's most important book of cultural criticism helped define the way in which the work of the Frankfurt School would be read and understood in the English-speaking world. Professor Weber has also published books on Balzac, Lacan, and Freud as well as on the relation of institutions and media to interpretation. In the 1980s he worked in Germany as a “dramaturge” in theater and opera productions. Out of the confrontation of that experience with his work in critical theory came the book, Theatricality as Medium, published in 2004 by Fordham University Press. In 2005 he published Targets of Opportunity: On the Militarization of Thinking, also at Fordham. His most recent book has been published in French under the title, Inquiétantes singularités (Disquieting Singularities). Translations of his writings into Chinese and Korean are currently in preparation. His current research projects include "Toward a Politics of Singularity" and "The Uncanny". Professor Weber began teaching at the Free University of Berlin and subsequently taught at the Johns Hopkins University and UCLA before coming to Northwestern in 2001. For more information on the work of Professor Weber visit Media Theory & Psychoanalysis & Philosophy

Erica Weitzman

Erica Weitzman

Assistant Professor

Phone number: 847-467-1849
Office location: Kresge Hall, Room 3-333
erica.weitzman@northwestern.edu
Erica Weitzman’s research focuses on questions of ethics and aesthetics in the long nineteenth century. She received her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from New York University in 2012. Prior to joining the Department of German at Northwestern University in 2014, she was a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Departments of German and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley from 2013–2014, and a Volkswagen Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow at the Universität Konstanz in the German Research Foundation (DFG) Graduiertenkolleg “Das Reale in der Kultur der Moderne” from 2012–2013. She has also been a doctoral fellow in the DFG-Graduiertenkolleg “Lebensformen und Lebenswissen” from 2008–2011. In 2017–2018 she is a visiting scholar at the Zentrum für Literatur- und Kulturforschung in Berlin, with a fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. Professor Weitzman’s first book, Irony’s Antics: Walser, Kafka, Roth, and the German Comic Tradition (Northwestern University Press, 2015), explores the role of the comic in early twentieth-century German literature and its roots in romantic irony’s challenge to idealist thinking. She also co-edited the collected volume Suspensionen. Über das Untote (Fink, 2015), whose essays consider aspects of “the undead” as a figure that destabilizes both the life/death binary and the epistemological regimes that it structures. Her current project, At the Limit of the Obscene: Realism, Profanation, Aesthetics, examines the concept of obscenity as a question of representation, perception, ontology, and affect in the context of the history of German realism from Stifter to Kafka. Teaching and research interests include: German-language literature, philosophy, and culture of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; realism and naturalism; critical theory, phenomenology, psychoanalysis; theories of irony, comedy, and humor; law and literature; fin de siècle and World War I; literatures of Mitteleuropa and Southeastern Europe. Recent Publications Books Irony’s Antics: Walser, Kafka, Roth, and the German Comic Tradition (Northwestern UP, 2015): http://www.nupress.northwestern.edu/content/ironys-antics Suspensionen. Über das Untote (Fink, 2015): https://www.fink.de/katalog/titel/978-3-7705-5713-4.html. Articles “Base Matter: Pathetic Fallacy in Gustav Freytag’s Soll und Haben,” Colloquia Germanica 47.3 (2014, published 2017), 37-62. “Ismail Kadare’s The File on H. and the Comedy of Epic,” Modern Language Review 3.3 (July 2016), 818-839. “‘Was bedeutet der Stein?’: Fetishism, Profanation, and Parody in Fontane’s Grete Minde,” Konturen 8 (2015), 71-98: http://journals.oregondigital.org/index.php/konturen/article/view/3706/3532. “Scham, oder die Metaphysik,” in Rücksendungen zu Jacques Derridas Die Postkarte. Ein essayistisches Glossar, ed. Matthias Schmidt (Turia + Kant, 2015), 329-340: http://www.turia.at/titel/aka_derr.php. “‘Ich bin nicht krank, ich bin ja tot’: Walsers kryogene Kunst,” in Suspensionen. Über das Untote, eds. Carolin Blumenberg, Alexandra Heimes, Erica Weitzman and Sophie Witt (Fink, 2015), 61-72. “Human Fragments: Plastic Surgery and Bare Life in Joseph Roth’s Feuilletons,” Journal of Austrian Studies 46.4 (Winter 2013), 87-109. “Odradek’s Laughter,” Journal of Cultural and Religious Theory 12.1 (Spring 2012), 31-36: http://www.jcrt.org/archives/12.1/weitzman.pdf. “Beyond the Legality Principle: Sacher-Masoch’s Economies of ‘Jewish Justice,’” Law and Literature 23.3 (Fall 2011), 442-470.

Ingrid Zeller

Ingrid Zeller

Professor of Instruction

Phone number: 847-491-8290
Office location: Kresge Hall, Room 3-331
izeller@northwestern.edu
Ingrid Zeller teaches courses at all levels in the German Department, directs the German Writing Center, serves as a director of the summer program “Berlin: Global City in the Center of Europe”, and has also coordinated Beginning and Intermediate German. Trained as a pianist at the Manhattan School of Music, she studied German language, culture, and literature at Columbia University in New York City. Professor Zeller’s teaching and research interests include curriculum design with special emphases on architecture, film, cities, and music. Her engagement with architecture finds expression in her course on “Bauhaus and Beyond - German Influences on the Chicago Skyline” and her ongoing accompanying web-project Bauhaus and Beyond. She has also co-produced (with Denise Meuser and Franziska Lys) an interactive architecture tour on the topic, a series of web–based interactive videos of a German architecture tour in Chicago. The intersection between music, culture, literature, performance, and language learning is also reflected in the wide range of courses that she teaches, ranging from “Stories through Songs” “Music, Magic, and the Mysteries of Language,” and “German through Opera,” to “Beginning German through Musical Journeys in Vienna,” and in the interdisciplinary and student-driven events she organizes. Among Professor Zeller’s goals are the meaningful integration of a “Lernort” and blended learning in the curriculum, resulting in innovative teaching materials and student projects, especially in the context of architecture and German heritage in Chicago. She is a certified volunteer docent for the Chicago Architecture Foundation (CAF) and conducts, both in English and German, river cruises and a number of walking tours on historic and modern skyscrapers and other architectural highlights in Chicago and Evanston. At Northwestern University, Professor Zeller is the faculty adviser for the German Undergraduate Advisory Board (GUAB) and a faculty fellow for Chapin Hall. an active member of the Council on Language Instruction (CLI), and has served as freshman adviser. Professor Zeller has a long association with the Association for Teachers of German (AATG), for which she is a professional consultant. She has served as testing chair, program, and vice-president, and is currently the president of the Northern Illinois Chapter of the AATG. Ingrid is a co-founder of the annual Northern Illinois College German Student Immersion Day for area colleges which took place for the first time in 2013. The sixth and most recent immersion day featured German hip hop group EINSHOCH6, whose first US Tour she also initiated and co-organized. Ingrid also serves as an AP reader, and collaborates with the Goethe-Institut Chicago. She regularly presents on films, architecture, music, collaboration and community, and other topics in the context of language acquisition at local, national, and international conferences, and also publishes on these topics. Professor Zeller’s engagement is reflected in the numerous teaching awards she has received. She has been elected to the Associated Student Government Faculty Honor Roll ten times and received the Northwestern Alumni Association Teaching Award in 2005. In 2009, Ingrid received the national AATG/Goethe-Institute Certificate of Merit Award. She was selected a Charles Deering McCormick University Distinguished Lecturer for Teaching Excellence at Northwestern University (2011-2012) and a faculty fellow for the Center for Civic Engagement. In 2015, Ingrid was awarded the Outstanding Educator Award from the Northern Illinois AATG (American Association for Teachers of German).

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